Updating a table in oracle spiritual speed dating melbourne

catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- ----------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 6 | Shows | Musicals | Musical theatre 7 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 9 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts (11 rows)select * from category where catid between 6 and 8; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 6 | Theatre | Musicals | Musical theatre 7 | Theatre | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Theatre | Opera | All opera and light opera (3 rows)select * from category where catname='Shows'; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 6 | Theatre | Shows | 7 | Theatre | Shows | 8 | Theatre | Shows | (3 rows)In this case, the CATDESC column was set to null because no default value was defined when the table was created.

Run the following commands to set the CATEGORY table data back to the original values: update category set catdesc='Broadway Musical' where category.catid in (select category.catid from category join event on category.catid = event.catid join venue on venue.venueid = event.venueid join sales on sales.eventid = event.eventid where venuecity='New York City' and catname='Musicals');select * from category order by 1; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 6 | Shows | Musicals | Broadway Musical 7 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre 8 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 9 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts (11 rows)update category set catid=100 from event where event.catid=category.catid; select * from category order by 1; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- ----------- -------------------------------------------- 1 | Sports | MLB | Major League Baseball 2 | Sports | NHL | National Hockey League 3 | Sports | NFL | National Football League 4 | Sports | NBA | National Basketball Association 5 | Sports | MLS | Major League Soccer 10 | Concerts | Jazz | All jazz singers and bands 11 | Concerts | Classical | All symphony, concerto, and choir concerts 100 | Shows | Opera | All opera and light opera 100 | Shows | Musicals | Musical theatre 100 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts 100 | Shows | Plays | All non-musical theatre (11 rows) Note that the EVENT table is listed in the FROM clause and the join condition to the target table is defined in the WHERE clause. These four rows are the rows whose CATID values were originally 6, 7, 8, and 9; only those four categories are represented in the EVENT table: Update the original 11 rows in the CATEGORY table by extending the previous example and adding another condition to the WHERE clause.

updating a table in oracle-13updating a table in oracle-39

I figured the two possible solutions were as follows: The issue with option 1 is that it means overriding the perfectly good out of the box behavior of ATG Profiles for the life of the application due to a set of awkward initial data.

Because of the restriction on the CATGROUP column, only one row qualifies for the update (although four rows qualify for the join).

update category set catid=100 from event where event.catid=category.catid and catgroup='Concerts'; select * from category where catid=100; catid | catgroup | catname | catdesc ------- ---------- --------- --------------------------------- 100 | Concerts | Pop | All rock and pop music concerts (1 row) The advantage to this approach is that the join criteria are clearly separated from any other criteria that qualify rows for the update.

encounters a change to a Data Row, it uses the Insert Command, Update Command, or Delete Command to process the change. Rows(0) category Row("Category Name") = "New Beverages" adapter. Write Line("Rows after update.") Dim row As Data Row For Each row In category Table. Write Line(": ", row(0), row(1)) Next End Using End Sub either by returning the auto-increment value as an output parameter of a stored procedure and mapping that to a column in a table, by returning the auto-increment value in the first row of a result set returned by a stored procedure or SQL statement, or by using the are sent to the data source is important.

This allows you to maximize the performance of your ADO. For example, if a primary key value for an existing row is updated, and a new row has been added with the new primary key value as a foreign key, it is important to process the update before the insert. By specifying a subset of rows to be updated, you can control the order in which inserts, updates, and deletes are processed.

It wasn’t until after sleeping on it that I realized I had put myself into the ATG box unnecessarily. I didn’t know much PL/SQL but some Googling (I love how that’s a common verb now, btw) led me to write up this: declare i number := 0; begin for r in (select id from dps_user) loop update dps_user set password = lower(password) where id = r.id; i := i 1; if mod(i, 10000) = 0 THEN -- Commit every 10000 records COMMIT; end if; end loop; commit; end; I’m no Oracle DBA, but it works!

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