Prevention programs youth dating violence dating christian women in europe dating sites

Below is a list of evidence-based and promising programs to prevent dating violence.Second Step (Grades K-5)Committee for Children 2815 Second Avenue, Suite 400Seattle, Washington 98121(800) [email protected] Dates (Grades 8-9)Hazelden Publishing15251 Pleasant Valley Road P. Box 11Center City, MN 55012-0176(800) [email protected] Respect (Grades 6-12)Safe Place P. Box 19454Austin, Texas 78760(512) [email protected] Violence Curriculum (Grades 9-12)Break the Cycle Hazelden Publishing15251 Pleasant Valley Road P. Box 11Center City, MN 55012-0176(800) [email protected] are many reliable web sites with teen dating violence prevention information and resources.Children exposed to IPV and child maltreatment are more likely to themselves become involved in IPV throughout adolescence and adulthood as both victims and perpetrators.A child can be an “indirect victim” of IPV as a witness and still face the serious consequences of the abuse.Nationally, one in three adolescents is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional or verbal abuse from a dating partner, a figure that far exceeds rates of other types of youth violence.

While it's hard to think that your children could become victims or perpetrators of dating violence or that it could be prevalent in your own community, one of the best ways to protect children is to increase awareness that dating violence is present in adolescence."As more middle- and high schools begin to implement dating violence prevention programs it is imperative that educators and policymakers understand which programs have been successful.School-based prevention programs were found to be successful in having a significant impact on dating violence knowledge and attitudes and, unlike victimization experiences, changes in knowledge were sustained over time.Lessons on sexual violence are often included as part of the Healthy Relationships curriculum.What are the goals of the Healthy Relationships Program? A 2009 survey conducted by Safe Futures found that in our area of Connecticut 12% of high school students have experienced physical violence in a dating relationship.The key to teen dating violence prevention is to intervene early – even as early as the elementary school years – as well as to increase awareness among parents and school personnel.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!