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Scientists now say an extraordinary find may lay that giant enigma, much like the biblical villain, to rest.

Archaeologists digging at the southern coastal city of Ashkelon announced Sunday the discovery of the first cemetery belonging to the ancient Israelites’ dreaded and shadowy nemeses, the Philistines.

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Speaking to the press at Jerusalem’s Rockefeller Museum, Daniel Master, one of the heads of the Leon Levy Expedition, said the cemetery, “the final great discovery” after 30 years of excavation of Ashkelon, could help shed light on the origins and customs of the Philistines.

The discovery of a sizable cemetery, with over 210 individuals, at a site conclusively linked to the Philistines, was a “critical missing link” that allows scholars “to fill out the story of the Philistines,” said Master, a professor of archaeology at Wheaton College.

holds a Masters degree in Diplomacy from Tel Aviv University and an Honors Bachelors degree from the University of Toronto in Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations, Jewish Studies, and English.

Today, thanks to the hard work of the Israelis, Tel-Aviv is now one of the most prominent cultural hubs of the world and is famous for its support of LGBT rights and other forms of social activism. Right next to Tel Aviv you will encounter Old Jaffa (also spelled Yafo), one of the oldest ports in the world dating more than 3000 years.It's a scene most Jewish families are familiar with: a table laid with two homemade challahs, Shabbat candles, a kiddush cup and an impressive spread of food. This image was posted online by Jenna Jameson, arguably the world's most famous former porn star. " the 41-year-old mostly-retired actress wrote next to the photo she posted on Twitter and Instagram."I made home made Chilean sea bass chraimeh, potato pancakes, Israeli salad and yummy challah!As he balances a cigarette between his long fingers, nails painted a deep blue to match a ring beset with a large turquoise stone on his hand, he explains that he is applying for asylum to stay because, exiled from Iran, he sees Israel as an “interesting, beautiful and amazing” place where he wants to continue his life. I like the afternoon sun,” he writes in the opening lines of his novella I Will Grow, I Will Bear Fruit…Figs.“For me, it’s not just another country," he says, speaking softly in Farsi. That’s where life would happen,” he says, as he describes an apartment where he lived with his mother, and the room where he would host his friends, fellow writers and lovers. Payam has also long been interested in Israel, the "forbidden fruit" of a country—a trait that earned him additional suspicion at home.Payam Feili, a 30-year-old gay Iranian poet, never thought he would find himself living under the jurisdiction of ‘the little Satan’, as the Islamic Republic’s founding Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khomenei liked to refer to Israel.

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