Is dating and being in a relationship the same

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If this mentality pervades our decision­making in so many realms, is it also affecting how we choose a romantic partner?

The question nagged at me—not least because of my own experiences watching promising relationships peter out over text message—so I set out on a mission.

Dating also means today that you are not necessarily committed to the same person.

One person might be dating two to three people at the same time, and there is no pressure for being exclusive with the one you are going out with.

Today’s teens and young adults involve a lot of technology in their dating; texting, writing messages to each other on social networking sites, flirting with multiple people are all included in dating.

Young adults also start dating casually in order to spend time together with the person of their choice.

They spend time in understanding the person and figuring out if there are feelings involved which might lead to a more serious kind of relationship where exclusivity is required.

I am perpetually indecisive about even the most mundane things, and I couldn’t imagine navigating such a huge life decision so quickly. Happily so—and probably more so than most people I know who had nonarranged marriages.

The first girl, he said, was “a little too tall,” and the second girl was “a little too short.” Then he met my mom. Let’s look at how I do things, maybe with a slightly less important decision, like the time I had to pick where to eat dinner in Seattle when I was on tour last year.

I read dozens of studies about love, how people connect and why they do or don’t stay together.

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