Internet dating addiction research

Online social networking sites (SNSs) have gained increasing popularity in the last decade, with individuals engaging in SNSs to connect with others who share similar interests.The perceived need to be online may result in compulsive use of SNSs, which in extreme cases may result in symptoms and consequences traditionally associated with substance-related addictions.Women usually feel more threatened by the emotional betrayal of a partner’s online affair, while men are more concerned about physical encounters, Hertlein says, but the gender differences are lessening.“That is starting to even out in part because of the equality of opportunity that the Internet brings to everybody,” she says.

Unlike objects such as pens and chocolates, their study shows, online dating is an experience, and one that unfolds over time.They negotiate over when to use it and when to abstain.A portion of them quarrel over its use and have had hurtful experiences caused by tech use.At the same time, some couples find that digital tools facilitate communication and support.A majority of those in couples maintain their own separate email and social media accounts, though a smaller number report sharing accounts and calendars. The broad statistical picture looks like this: As a broad pattern, those who have been married or partnered ten years or less have digital communication and sharing habits that differ substantially from those who have been partnered longer.While men traditionally have been the more unfaithful sex, gender roles are reversing in some cases as more women experience cybersex.

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